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Esophageal constrictions level

Constrictions of oesophagus. The esophagus has 4 areas where the lumen is narrow compared to the rest of the oesphagus. They are: Beginning of oesophagus ( pharyngoesophageal junction) - 6 inches from incisor teeth. level where a rch of aorta crosses oesophagus - 9 inches from incisor teeth. At the level where the left main bronchus crosses. The lower esophageal sphincter, also known as the phrenic ampulla or the esophageal vestibule, represents a 2-4 cm long dilatation between the A-ring and B-ring 6. There are three normal esophageal constrictions that should not be confused for pathological constrictions: cervical constriction: due to cricoid cartilage at the level of C5/ First constriction, at the pharyngo-esophageal junction, 9 cm (6 inches) from the incisor teeth. Second constriction, where it's crossed by the arch of aorta, 22.5 cm (9 inches) from the incisor teeth. Third constriction, where it's crossed by the left principal bronchus, 27.5 cm (11 inches) from the incisor teeth It sits left of the midline at the level of the T11 vertebra and designates the esophagogastric junction, which is an important landmark where the mucosa abruptly changes from the stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus to the simple columnar epithelium of the stomach This is the first physiological constriction of the esophagus (the first esophageal sphincter). At the level of the aortic arch, a flat depression on the left contour of the shade of the esophagus is determined (the second physiological constriction) and somewhat lower - a shallow depression from the left main bronchus (third physiological.

The diagnosis of esophageal cancer is established with flexible endoscopy with biopsy [7]. Traditionally barium swallow was used as a diagnostic tool in esophageal cancer care, a so-called road map before endoscopy. Polypoid tumors, strictures with mucosal irregularity, and apple core constrictions are characteristic findings o The oesophagus is a fibromuscular tube, approximately 25cm in length that transports food from the pharynx to the stomach. It originates at the inferior border of the cricoid cartilage, C6, extending to the cardiac orifice of the stomach, T11. Anatomically, the oesophagus can be divided into two parts: thoracic and abdominal Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia . Dysplasia is the presence of precancerous cells. Your doctor may recommend frequent monitoring or treatment to prevent cancer from developing. Low-grade dysplasia. Low-grade dysplasia means you have some abnormal cells, but the majority aren't affected. In this case, you may just need frequent checks to. The esophagus (oesophagus) is a 25 cm long fibromuscular tube extending from the pharynx (C6 level) to the stomach (T11 level). It consists of muscles that run both longitudinally and circularly, entering into the abdominal cavity via the right crus of the diaphragm at the level of the tenth thoracic vertebrae

pressure around 25 mm Hg. An empty esophagus collapses, but three anatomic constrictions aect the adult esophagus: 1. At the cricopharyngeus muscle (C6) 2. At the level of the aortic arch (T4) 3. At the gastroesophageal junction (T10 to T11) The pediatric esophagus gets two additional areas of constriction: 1. At the thoracic inlet (T1) 2 The esophagus has 3 constrictions in its vertical course, as follows: The first constriction is at 15 cm from the upper incisor teeth, where the esophagus commences at the cricopharyngeal..

These constrictions are as follows: Cervical constriction - is caused by the cricoid cartilage and is constricted by the upper esophageal sphincter until the sphincter relaxes in response to a bolus. Thoracic/aortal constriction - is caused by the proximity of the esophagus to the aortic arch (arcus aorta) and the left main bronchus During its course, the esophagus encounters three anatomic constrictions - (1) at the level of the cricopharyngeus muscle, (2) as it travels posteriorly to the aortic arch/left mainstem bronchus and (3) at the level of esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm

The majority of strictures in Barrett esophagus are typical peptic strictures in the distal esophagus (, 19 20). However, a small percentage of patients with Barrett esophagus develop strictures in the upper or midesophagus below the level of the aortic arch (, 19 20) The esophagus is the hollow, muscular tube that carries food and liquids from the throat to the stomach. The esophagus runs through the middle of the chest cavity, an area known as the mediastinum and has two sphincters that control opening and closing. The primary function of the esophagus is to transport food from the mouth to the stomach 5.6a esophagus (constrictions (aortic arch, left main bronchus, esophageal: 5.6a esophagus (constrictions, layers, muscularis propria, swallowing, extension. In humans, the esophagus generally starts around the level of the sixth cervical vertebra behind the cricoid cartilage of the trachea, enters the diaphragm at about the level of the tenth thoracic vertebra, and ends at the cardia of the stomach, at the level of the eleventh thoracic vertebra. The esophagus is usually about 25 cm (10 in) in length Along its vertical course, the esophagus has three constrictions: The first constriction is approximately 15 cm from the upper incisor teeth, where the esophagus begins at the cricopharyngeal sphincter at the level of the sixth cervical vertebra

Constrictions of oesophagus « PG Blaze

Esophageal Constrictions. The esophagus has three anatomic and physiologic constrictions. The first is where the pharynx joins the upper end, the second is where the aortic arch and the left bronchus cross its anterior surface, and the third occurs where the esophagus passes through the diaphragm into the stomach. These constrictions are of. Diseases of the Esophagus: Diagnosis with Esophagography. 1 From the Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Received February 8, 2005; revision requested April 7; revision received April 25; accepted June 2. Address correspondence to M.S.L. (e-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu )

Esophagus Radiology Reference Article Radiopaedia

Its length is 1.5-2.0 cm. It is located at the level of the esophageal aperture of the diaphragm. At this level, the intrinsic adventitia of the esophagus is closely related to the diaphragmatic ligaments. Here, esophageal-diaphragmatic membranes are formed that play a role in the formation of hiatal hernia Anatomically there are two separate constrictions: the aortic at the level of T4 with diameters of 1.9 × 2.3 cm and the bronchial at the level of T5 with diameters of 1.7 × 2.3 cm. The diaphragmatic constriction at the level of T9 or T10 with a diameter of 2.3 cm 24. The Anatomy of the Trachea The trachea is a tubular structure which is located at the front of the neck Begins : the level of the C6 ( the thyroid cartilage). Bifurcating: into right and left main bronchi (the level of the T5 ) Length: 10 to 15cm Diameter :16-18 mm. 25 Esophageal tear. Esophageal tear also known as esophageal rupture, is a rare but serious medical emergency with a very high mortality rate over 40%, especially if the diagnosis is delayed in septic patients 1).While the true incidence of esophageal tear is unclear 2), the majority of esophageal tear cases (up to 59%) are iatrogenic 3) resulting from esophagoscopy 4) despite the actual risk of. During its course, the esophagus encounters three anatomic constrictions - (1) at the level of the cricopharyngeus muscle, (2) as it travels posteriorly to the aortic arch/left mainstem bronchus, and (3) at the level of esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. These constrictions are considered as the most frequent site for a foreign body or food.

Easy Notes On 【Esophagus 】Learn in Just 4 Minutes! - Earth

Anatomy of the abdominal viscera: Esophagus and stomach

•Know the esophageal constrictions and their anatomical relations. •Know the detailed blood supply and innervation of the esophagus. cartilage at the level of the 6th cervical vertebra to the cardiac orifice of the stomach •The upper 5% of the esophagus consists of skeletal muscle only Ureteric Orifice. Esophagus has 4 areas of constriction whereas ureter has 5. Cricopharyngeal sphincter=Ureteropelvic jn. Crossing of arch of aorta=Crossing of iliac artery. Left main bronchus=vasdeferens/broad ligament. Diaphragmatic hiatus=Ureterovesical jn. Cricopharyngeal sphincter is the commonest site of foreign body The esophagus is approximately 25 centimeters long (9.84 inches) and 2 centimeters (0.8 inches) wide. It starts at the inferior edge of cricoid cartilage at the sixth cervical vertebra (C6) level. It goes in the neck region and thoracic and abdominal cavities. The pharynx most distal part, known as the laryngopharynx, is above the esophagus. Esophageal rings and webs are folds that block your esophagus either partially or completely. Rings are bands of normal esophageal tissue that form constrictions around the inside of the esophagus. They occur in the lower esophagus. Webs, which arise in the upper esophagus, are thin layers of cells that grow across the inside of the esophagus Ring-like constrictions have been described at locations throughout the length of the esophagus. The terms web and ring have been used for these focal esophageal constrictions. For the purposes of this question, the term ring will be limited to narrowings in the esophagogastric region (EGR) occurring predominantly at the upper and lower borders.

Anatomy of the Esophagus Victor Maevsky Thomas J. Watson Anatomy of the Esophagus Overview The esophagus is a muscular tube extending from the pharynx to the stomach and bordered by two sphincters. It has one primary responsibility: the aboral transport of ingested food, liquid, and saliva. Prevention of reflux of gastric contents is inherent t Starting at the level of the cricoid cartilage (C6), the esophagus pierces the diaphragm at the vertebral level T10 and enters the stomach at the level T11. There are four constrictions in the oesophagus with the first at its beginning where it connects to the pharynx at the pharyngeo-oesophageal junction Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease characterized by smooth muscle atrophy and fibrosis in the esophageal wall. Affected individuals often have a patulous, incompetent lower esophageal sphincter with spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux as well as absent primary peristalsis in the esophagus below the level of the aortic arch

Normal X-ray anatomy of the esophagus Competently about

The Oesophagus - Location - Sphincters - TeachMeAnatom

The cricopharyngeal or pharyngoesophageal constriction (diameters 1.7 × 2.3 cm). The bronchoaortic constriction. Anatomically there are two separate constrictions: the aortic at the level of T4 with diameters of 1.9 × 2.3 cm, and the bronchial at the level of T5 with diameters of 1.7 × 2.3 cm Perforations of both esophagus and aorta after swallowing foreign bodies have been described, with aorto-esophageal fistulas at the level of the descending aorta or aortic arch An empty esophagus collapses, but three anatomic constrictions affect the adult esophagus: + + At the cricopharyngeus muscle (C6) At the level of the aortic arch (T4) At the gastroesophageal junction (T10 to T11) + + The pediatric esophagus gets two additional areas of constriction: + Tube that connects the pharynx (at the level of C6) to the stomach (at the level of T11) Length: ∼ 25 cm; Located between trachea and spine; Crosses the diaphragm at T10 through the esophageal hiatus. The thoracic esophagus is extraperitoneal. The abdominal part is intraperitoneal. Constrictions of esophagus. Cricopharyngeal sphincter at C CONSTRICTIONS OF ESOPHAGUS. Oesophagus shows 4 constrictions-At its begining at C6 vertebra:- 15 cm (6 inches) from incisor. At the level of T4 vertebra where it is crossed by arch of aorta:- 22.5 cm (9 inches) from incisor. At the level of T6 vertebra where it is crossed by left principal bronchus:- 27.5 cm (11 inches) from incisor

Barrett's Esophagus: What is it, Symptoms, Treatment & Test

  1. Congenital esophageal stenosis in adults is usually characterized on esophagography by the presence of smooth, tapered strictures in the upper esophagus or midesophagus. 115, 116, 119, 120 The strictures often contain multiple ringlike constrictions, producing a distinctive radiographic appearance on double-contrast esophagograms (Fig. 29-22.
  2. Topographic Relationships, Contours and Normal Construction of Esophagus Topography and Constrictions of Esophagus Variant Image ID: 4554 Add to Lightbo
  3. ent at 5 cm contrasted and the 10-cm level. With esophageal compression there is an expansion in the thickness of roundabout and longitudinal muscle in typical subjects and in.
  4. Pill esophagitis. Prolonged mucosal contact with ingested material may occur at sites of esophageal constrictions [3, 4].These sites include the level of cricoid cartilage, the crossing of the aorta and left bronchus, and the diaphragmatic sphincter

the level of the 10th thoracic vertebra to join the stomach DIAPHRAGM, INFERIOR VIEW Caval =T8 Inferior vena cava Right Phrenic nerve Esophageal =T10 Esophagus Vagus nerve Aortic =T12 Aorta Thoracic duct Azygous vein Esophageal constrictions CERVICAL CONSTRICTION (upper esophageal sphincter): - beginning at the pharyngoesophageal junction. Also remember, the phrenic nerve pierces level T8 along with the IVC, the vagus nerve pierces T10 along with the esophagus, and the thoracic duct pierces at level T12 along with the aorta. Now, the esophagus may have 3 anatomic impressions or constrictions in the posterior mediastinum caused by three structures it meets on its way down: the. three physiological constrictions are located (1) at the level of the cricoid cartilage (sixth cervical level), (2) at the arch of the aorta, and (3) at the esophageal hiatus. It is at these constrictions that the greatest amount of irritation takes place and the greater number of patho¬ logical lesions are observed. Most foreign bodies ar Along its vertical course, the esophagus has three constrictions: 1. The first constriction is approximately 15 cm from the upper incisor teeth, where the esophagus begins at the cricopharyngeal sphincter at the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. 2. The second constriction is approximately 23 cm from the upper incisor, which is the landmark.

Esophagus: Anatomy, sphincters, arteries, veins, nerves

Esophagus Anatomy: Gross Anatomy, Microscopic Anatomy

  1. The esophagus passes through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, which is at the T10 level, to end in the cardiac portion of the stomach. 6. Consider the course, relations, constrictions of the esophagus. (N232, TG4-49, TG7-91) For course and relations, see above. Constrictions of the esophagus are found at its beginning, at the tracheal.
  2. Foreign body esophagus: types and site of impaction (1) The anatomical division according to location into pharyngo-oesophageal (Zenker's), mid-oesophageal (tracheobronchial) and distal (epiphrenic) diverticula is the most suitable for radiological reporting
  3. nia, esophageal constrictions, and adhesion [26]. sum of the CSA between the patients who bleed and those who did not bleed was significantly different at the p < 0.018 level. The OR for the.

Consequently, there are fewer opportunities for reflux to occur in the supine position. Second, in the upright position, there is a 12-mmHg pressure gradient between the resting, positive intra-abdominal pressure measured in the stomach and the most negative intrathoracic pressure measured in the esophagus at midthoracic level Development of. Esophagus Develops from the cranial foregut In week 4, a small diverticulum appears at the ventral wall of the foregut , the tracheobronchial diverticulum. It becomes separated from the foregut by the esophagotracheal septum.. Gross Anatomy - esophagus Fibromuscular tube about 10/ 25 cm long: C6T10. Esophageal Constrictions: Superiorly: level of cricoid cartilage, junction with. Esophagus- surgical anatomy Dr. Navin Kumar Assistant Professo Structure. The esophagus is one of the upper parts of the digestive system.There are taste buds on its upper part. It begins at the back of the mouth, passing downwards through the rear part of the mediastinum, through the diaphragm, and into the stomach.In humans, the esophagus generally starts around the level of the sixth cervical vertebra behind the cricoid cartilage of the trachea, enters. There are several indentations and constrictions of the esophagus: at its commencement at the oropharyngeal junction caused by the CP muscle and cricoid cartilage, where crossed by the aortic arch (aortic constriction), just below where the left main bronchus crosses, and, finally, where it traverses the diaphragm by the inferior esophageal.

Video: The Esophagus: Anatomy, Functions, and Diseases Medical

Physiology, Lower Esophageal Sphincte

At Cardio-esophageal Junction, Level of T11, 10 cm behind the seventh Sterno - Costal Junction ca 2 cm away from sternal left border. Where do we find its Constrictions? 15, 22, 27, 38, 41 from incisor teeth The esophagus is divided into 3 segments i.e cervical, thoracic, and abdominal. Constrictions: The trachea has no constrictions along its path. The esophagus has three constrictions. The first is at the junction with the pharynx. The second is at the crossing with the aortic arch and the left main bronchus Topographic Relationships, Contours and Normal Construction of Esophagus Topography and Constrictions of Esophagu Structure. The esophagus is one of the upper parts of the digestive system.At the mouth opening, it is continuous with the back of the oral cavity, passing downwards through the rear part of the mediastinum, through the diaphragm, and into the stomach.In humans, the esophagus generally starts around the level of the sixth cervical vertebra (C6) behind the cricoid cartilage, enters the. Figure 2 - Bar chart showing levels of esophageal constrictions as seen on barium swallow Based on the type of constriction that was read on the barium swallow, results were categorised into anteroposterior constriction and circumferential constriction. 3 patients also presented with multiple constrictions

Radiologic Diagnosis of Benign Esophageal Strictures: A

Schatzki ring is a benign, thin, circular mucosal and submucosal membrane seen at the squamocolumnar junction of the distal esophagus that does not contain muscularis propria. [ 1] Since the 1950s, several investigators have published reports of patients with dysphagia who had associated lower esophageal ringlike constrictions, but each. Department of Radiology of the Loyola University Medical Center, USA. Publicationdate 2007-11-26. In Esophagus part I we will discuss: Basic anatomy and function. Rings, webs and diverticula. Hiatus hernia. Inflammation and infection. Strictures. Acute esophageal syndromes Cirrhosis of the liver was the twelfth leading cause of death in the United States in 2005 and developed as a consequence of alcoholism in over 45 percent of cases, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reports 4. Alcoholics often develop problems with the esophagus, which is the tube that leads from the mouth to the stomach, as a consequence of cirrhosis or in addition to the.

expression weaken the effects of serotonin, subsequently causing esophageal mucosal damage and esophagitis [7]. The 5-HT1-, 5-HT2-, 5-HT3-, and 5-HT4-receptors are important for esophageal motility and the transient lowering of esophageal sphincter constrictions in humans [9, 10 11] Dysphagia. Several diseases such as reflux esophagitis, esophageal carcinoma, systemic sclerosis, esophageal spasm, pseudoachalasia, stroke, esophageal candidiasis and Chagas disease can present with dysphagia, and hence must be differentiated from one another. For the differential diagnosis based on dysphagia and weight loss click here The esophagus is a muscular conduit extending from the inferior portion of the pharynx to the superior portion of the stomach. At the approximate level of the sixth cervical vertebra, the esophagus begins at the pharyngoesophageal junction in the hypopharynx and descends to the level of the 11th thoracic vertebra, where it enters the cardia. Anatomical constrictions NB: The sites of these constrictions are clinically important in connection with the passage of instruments along the esophagus - gastroscopy! 15 Three anatomical constrictions: pharyngeal - 15 cm from the incisor teeth bronchial - 24 cm from the incisors diaphragmatic - 40 cm from the incisor Esophagus. The esophagus is a long, thin, and muscular tube that connects the pharynx (throat) to the stomach. It forms an important piece of the gastrointestinal tract and functions as the conduit for food and liquids that have been swallowed into the pharynx to reach the stomach. The esophagus is about 9-10 inches (25 centimeters) long and.

Arterial Supply of the Esophagus. Image • Posted on July 4, 2017. by thecomicalanatomist. The Ol' Answers (A) Esophageal branch of the internal thyroid artery (B) Inferior thyroid artery (C) Thyrocervical trunk (D) Vertebral artery (E) Subclavian artery (F) Common carotid artery (G) Brachiocephalic trunk (H) Common carotid artery (I) Arch. The esophagus is a fibromuscular tube, about 25 cm (10 in) long in adults, which travels behind the trachea and heart, passes through the diaphragm and empties into the uppermost region of the stomach. During swallowing, the epiglottis tilts back..

Clinical Anatomy of Ureter. The ureters are a pair of muscular tubes which convey the urine from kidneys (renal pelvis) to the urinary bladder. Arises from the renal pelvis (leaves kidney from hilum situated medially) formed by calyces encircling the renal papillae. At the lower end of kidney, it becomes continuous with the abdominal ureter Esophageal varices almost always occur in people who have cirrhosis of the liver. Cirrhosis causes scarring of the liver, which slows the flow of blood through the liver. Scarring causes blood to back up in the portal vein, the main vein that delivers blood from the stomach and intestines to the liver. This back up causes high blood pressure.

esophagus in a plexus.[3] Constrictions The esophagus has four points of constriction. When a corrosive substance, or a solid object is swallowed, it is most likely to lodge and damage one of these four points. These constrictions arise from particular structures that compress the esophagus The course of the esophagus is marked by several indentations and constrictions: 1.) The first narrowing of the esophagus is found at its commencement, caused by the cricopharyngeus muscle and the cricoid cartilage . This narrowing is in fact the upper esophageal sphincter. 2.) The esophagus is indented on its left side by the arch of the aorta

Esophagus: Structure, Function, and Condition

  1. Non-cardiac chest pain is the term that is used to describe pain in the chest that is not caused by heart disease or a heart attack. In most people, non-cardiac chest pain is related to a problem with the esophagus, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Other causes include muscle or bone problems, lung conditions or diseases, stomach.
  2. Schatzki's rings are the most common bandlike constriction of the esophagus. This lesion is typically symmetric and located at the esophagogastric junction (Figure 7-1, B).Asymptomatic Schatzki's rings are detected in approximately 10% of the population. 4 The ring is always noted in the presence of a hiatal hernia.However, most hiatal hernias are not associated with Schatzki's rings
  3. ed in vivo by esophagoscope. It's performed to visualize the interior of the esophagus while passing esophagoscope, the sites of normal constrictions ought to be kept in..
  4. al. From tracheal bifuraction midway to gastroesophageal.
  5. GERD and measure the level of damage to your esophagus. These include: Esophageal pH studies measure acid reflux levels in the esophagus for 24 hours, using a tube with an acid (pH) sensor at the tip. Similarly, the Bravo® Wireless pH Monitoring Capsule measures acid levels for up to 96 hours

5.6a esophagus (constrictions (aortic arch, left main ..

  1. Schatzki rings are muscular or mucosal and submucosal concentric constrictions in the lower third of the esophagus. They were first reported in the 1950s but Schatzki was the first to define them accurately and to categorize them into two types, A and B
  2. Lower esophageal rings have been extensively re- viewed' but their pathogenesis remains con- troversial. The most popular theories suggest either congenital or inflammatory origin. Our patient's esophagus had an unusual appear- ance of numerous constrictions throughout its length
  3. Question: Hello, in the past few years I have developed a worsening condition of esophageal motility disorder.In 2015 a GI said I had a hiatus hernia, in 2016 a different GI said he saw nothing and it was all in my head.I basically throw up 90% of what I try to eat or drink
Esophagus - Wikipedia

Esophagus - Wikipedi

Other Esophagus Problems: Mallory-Weiss Tear - It is characterized by a tearing in the lining of food pipe that leads to vomiting blood.. Esophagitis - The inflammatory condition of esophagitis occurs due to acidic irritation or esophageal infection.. Barrett's Esophagus - Barrett's esophagus is an irritation and change in structure of its lower part that may lead to cancer Esophageal constrictions. Normally, the esophagus has three anatomic constrictions at the following levels; [3] [4] At the esophageal inlet, where the pharynx joins the esophagus, behind the cricoid cartilage (14-16 cm from the incisor teeth) Exits through ESOPHAGEAL HIATUS in the diaphragm at T10 vert level together with Anterior and Posterior vagal trunks (Ten Eggs) 3 esophageal sites prone to constrictions. 1. Level of aortic arch. 2. L main bronchus. 2. Level of diaphragmatic esophageal hiatus. Esophageal diverticula Change of the distal esophagus from stratified squamous to simple columnar with goblet cells. This is precancerous (adenocarcinoma) What are the four anatomical esophageal constrictions? 1. upper esophageal sphincter 2. Aortic arch crosses 3. Left bronchus 4. Esophageal hiatus at the diaphragm 22 What vertebral level is the diaphragm at. esophagus with multiple ringlike constrictions in region of stricture ( arrows). Proximal end of stricture is not well visualized because of incomplete esophageal distention at this level. B, Single-contrast esophagram with greater distention than in A shows tapered stricture ( black arrows ) in uppe

EsophagusAcute esophageal necrosis - WikipediaBarium swallow,,Carcinoma oesophagusOesophagus ppt for ss17

elderly. Anatomically these foreign bodies are commonly found at the various natural constrictions of oesophagus (i.e. cricopharynx, at the cross over of the aortic arch at the level of mid esophagus, and at the lower end of esophagus). Classification of patients with esophageal foreign bodies: 1. Pediatric patients. 2. Psychiatric patients. 3 Thus, it is important for a surgeon to maintain the integrity of the strongest mucosal layer and to take special care at the level of esophageal constrictions [8, 9]. Several mechanism including shearing along the longitudinal axis, direct piercing, thinning from necrosis of esophageal wall and bursting from the radial force may play in. Structure []. The esophagus is one of the upper parts of the digestive system.There are taste buds on its upper part. It begins at the back of the mouth, passing downwards through the rear part of the mediastinum, through the diaphragm, and into the stomach.In humans, the esophagus generally starts around the level of the sixth cervical vertebra behind the cricoid cartilage of the trachea. Study 07-01/02 GIT Gx Esophagus & Stomach flashcards from Kristine Veneracion's De La Salle University-Manila class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. Learn faster with spaced repetition The esophagus (American English) or oesophagus (British English; see spelling differences) (/ ɪ ˈ s ɒ f ə ɡ ə s /), informally known as the food pipe or gullet, is an organ in vertebrates through which food passes, aided by peristaltic contractions, from the pharynx to the stomach.The esophagus is a fibromuscular tube, about 25 cm (10 in) long in adults, which travels behind the trachea. Structure. The esophagus is one of the upper parts of the digestive system.There are taste buds on its upper part. [2] It begins at the back of the mouth, passing downwards through the rear part of the mediastinum, through the diaphragm, and into the stomach.In humans, the esophagus generally starts around the level of the sixth cervical vertebra behind the cricoid cartilage of the trachea.